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1.Emerging Issues

Author:Phiri,Michael;Chen,Bing

Source:SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology,2014,Vol.

Abstract:This brief started by looking at the changing context for national and international healthcare systems, before reviewing the healthcare premises information, guidance and tools that underlie the approach in which sustainability is to be seen as integrated with evidence-based design rather than as divorced and separate themes. However, to understand the role these aspects play, it is also essential to consider both the historical context and, in particular, the organisational structures of the different healthcare systems whether these are national or international. This chapter discusses emerging issues from the approach that adopts design for sustainability integrated with evidence-based design. The aim is to help decision-making within the area of healthcare premises, planning and design whether this is nationally or globally. The crucial emerging issues start with the problem of definitions of ‘Evidence’ and ‘Sustainability’ but include the debates surrounding several themes: Centralisation versus Decentralisation, the nature of Public versus Private Sector Involvement, National versus International Standards to Prescription versus Performance Standards. Addressing these issues has an important bearing on the development of design for sustainability and evidence-based design as science.

2.The neo-liberal turn: ‘Culture’-led urban regeneration in Shanghai

Author:Zhong,Sheng

Source:The Routledge Companion to Urban Regeneration,2013,Vol.

Abstract:The chapter problematizes the nature of ‘culture’-led urban regeneration practices in Shanghai by differentiating between the intentions of regenerative efforts and the real outcomes of policy initiatives. Based on the case study of Shanghai Sculpture Space, the chapter reveals that Shanghai’s so-called ‘culture’- led urban regeneration program implemented through public-private partnership was actually propertyled. The biggest beneficiaries of the process were landed interests. The heavy involvement of the local state and government-linked institutions, however, did not result in the honoring of community sociocultural needs that a genuine culture-led urban regeneration project would require.

3.A pedagogical approach to designing the future of China’s urban fringe

Author:Kiddle,Rebecca;Kim,Joon Sik;Chen,Bing

Source:Urban China's Rural Fringe: Actors, Dimensions and Management Challenges,2016,Vol.

Abstract:© 2016 Giulio Verdini, Yiwen Wang, Xiaonan Zhang and the contributors. To safeguard the overall quality of the development of urban and rural areas, as increasingly addressed in China’s strategic policy documents, there is an urgent need to provide a new vision for planning education, nurturing an interdisciplinary learning environment that can promote critical thinking as a basis for action or intervention. The urban and rural nexus highlights an area of particular tension as it works to house existing villagers alongside the rising middle classes keen for a more suburban/rural aspect (see Sturzacker and Law in this volume). This challenges planners to think beyond the scope of statutory systems and consider planning as an activity that professionals facilitate, rather than own or monopolize. The planning education system should, therefore, equip prospective planners with not only professional knowledge, but the capability to involve a range of stakeholders in more genuinely collaborative ways. On the urban fringe where very diverse social groups and needs meet, this ability to involve the range of stakeholders in decision-making processes is all the more important.

4.Cultural institutional reform and the changing society in China

Author:Zhong,Sheng

Source:Governing Society In Contemporary China,2016,Vol.

Abstract:Wholly regarded as social welfare and propaganda before the economic reform, cultural production is increasingly linked to profit-making and economic competitiveness in contemporary China. The reform of public cultural institutions and the promotion of cultural industries are reflective of this new understanding. This chapter indicates that the changing society is an important force driving the cultural reform. However, the rush towards market also causes concern to the Party-state and this leads to the redress of the issue in recent years. In light of the multiple roles of culture, this chapter suggests that the energetic vibe from the society would be advantageous in making China a great power of culture….

5.Collaborative approaches for planning the rural areas of Chinese cities

Author:Zhong,Sheng;Guo,Yu

Source:Urban China's Rural Fringe: Actors, Dimensions and Management Challenges,2016,Vol.

Abstract:© 2016 Giulio Verdini, Yiwen Wang, Xiaonan Zhang and the contributors. The rapid urbanization process in China has posed significant threats to land resources not only in quantity but also in quality. In the peri-urban areas of Chinese cities, the pressures from urban sprawl have resulted in scattered construction lands mixed with cultivated lands. This highly inefficient use of rural construction, especially in peri-urban areas, has been identified as a major problem and, consequently, rural land consolidation has been increasingly considered as a priority for reaching more sustainable rural planning outcomes. Based on the existing experiences of land ticket reform, this chapter argues that market-based land ticket represents a promising approach to China’s rural land consolidation practises and should be allowed to be used in a wider scope. However, reform of the existing land ticket and rural land consolidation processes is also needed to ensure better results. A perspective from participative and collaborative planning will shed light on how to achieve this outcome.

6.A Review of Design Approaches + Strategies

Author:Phiri,Michael;Chen,Bing

Source:SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology,2014,Vol.

Abstract:Identification and analysis of design strategies is essential for this brief to increase our knowledge and understanding in order to provide a rationale basis and underpin the joint approach to property and asset or infrastructure design and management. These are advocated as a way to address in the healthcare sector fragmentation, duplication, redundancy, unsustainable transportation and non-standardisation due to the creation of varying levels of accommodation standards. Design strategies are important because they can aid organisations determine what to produce and do (products or outcomes), how and when to do it (process) and how consistently innovative the products are and over time perform responding to changing contexts (performance) while delivering on return on investment. They can therefore play a vital integrating role in connecting design endeavours to organisation’s business strategy, in identifying the core business and focus of an organisation, in adopting the latest technologies, translating insights into actions and their prioritisation. A brief review of a selection of the main design approaches and strategies from the many that have been advocated for architectural healthcare design in recent times is conducted to provide a suitable basis for the development of technical guidance and tools. These include interrelated design for sustainability, evidence-based design, lean health care and lean-led design, six sigma, simulation modelling, learning from completed construction projects [post-project evaluations (PPE) and post-occupancy evaluations (POE)] and varying combinations of these. Identifying approaches towards measuring and monitoring the environmental impact of new buildings and refurbishment of existing buildings is essential to respond to how best projects in future minimise direct environmental effect. The underlying premise includes the use of different materials, how to manage resources optimally and lessons learnt from the most innovative methods which have been undertaken or applied to address these issues.

7.Introduction

Author:Phiri,Michael;Chen,Bing

Source:SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology,2014,Vol.

Abstract:© 2014, The Author(s). Worldwide, healthcare organisations are facing challenges and demands to improve design quality and safety of their estate, while addressing burgeoning safety legislation and austere funding arrangements due to the 2007–2010 financial crisis and economic downturn. This has created an imperative for all providers, commissioners and regulators to address how the healthcare environment may need to change. Although widely acknowledged that healthcare guidance/standards and tools are essential to enhance quality and safety in health care, no studies have been published, nor indeed been carried out, with regard to their usefulness. By their very nature, studying guidance and tools is rarely an attractive subject for practitioners and academics alike. However, notable publications include sustainable healthcare architecture aimed at covering the twin big and complex subjects of sustainability and healthcare architecture (Guenther and Vittori: Sustainable healthcare architecture, 2007); a step-by-step guide of how to implement an evidence-based design (EBD) process and those seeking to learn the methodology for EBD of healthcare facilities (Cama: Evidence-based healthcare design, 2009); and a description of evidence-based healthcare facility design that is meant to support quality care and reduce costs (McCullough: Evidence-based healthcare design, 2009). Crucially, the lack of studies and consequently dearth of publications that focus on the role of technical guidance and tools is manifested by the absence of policies and appropriate strategies, as well as a rationale, not only for aiding decision-making in healthcare organisations, but also for acknowledging that, fundamentally, technologies, policies and services are subject to shorter life cycles than the relatively inflexible built assets that support them. This Springer Brief aims to increase our understanding of the role played by technical guidance/standards and tools in design, construction and operation of healthcare facilities as well as ultimately establishing the impact of the physical environment on staff and patient outcomes. Consequently, the aim is for the development of guidance and tools that will aid the creation of architectural environments of quality and safety, which will lead to positive patients’ health outcomes and improved staff productivity.

8.Urban-rural relations in the context of new urbanization: The case of Suzhou

Author:Zhong,Sheng;Xin,Shengxi

Source:Suzhou in Transition,2020,Vol.

9.Conclusions

Author:Phiri,Michael;Chen,Bing

Source:SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology,2014,Vol.

Abstract:To achieve success, providers, commissioners and regulators of the delivery of healthcare or more specifically the accommodation in which health and social care is provided need to proactively embrace the principles of design for sustainability integrated with evidence-based design. Also of importance is that the process involves users or occupants of the healthcare facilities. Otherwise, efforts to meet sustainability targets and aspirations for design quality improvement are futile without a meaningful engagement of users. This means that the imperative is for a cultural shift and raising awareness among the users and managers of healthcare facilities at both the local level of a clinic, the geographical health economy comprising hospitals, clinics and care homes, and the national healthcare system as well as globally. A culture change and increased awareness is also not enough but needs to be translated into actions by both individuals and organisations. Within the organisation, the support needs to emanate from the top down in order to be effective. Applying and implementing design for sustainability is perhaps the greatest challenge for any organisation that adopts and commits to this approach. The case studies in this brief highlight the different starting points and focus. In particular, the strategy in the UK has tended to be that of providing publicly sponsored and funded health care guidance and design tools to aid the design process compared with the US where the focus on practice has encouraged private firms to implement principles of sustainable evidence-based design.

10.Chengzhongcun in China

Author:Zhong,Sheng

Source:China: Development and Governance,2012,Vol.

11.Case Studies: Design Practice and Application of Healthcare Technical Guidance and Tools

Author:Phiri,Michael;Chen,Bing

Source:SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology,2014,Vol.

Abstract:Through a number of carefully selected purpose-built Case Studies from the UK, EU, USA, China and Australasia, this section indicates how strategies that integrate sustainability and evidence-based design have been implemented in healthcare design practice. The aim is to document the key drivers for these case study projects and the consequences of applying these design approaches. In doing so, the brief seeks to increase our understanding of the relationship between theory and practice, thus uncovering mechanisms to embed sustainability and evidence-based design in working practices. Ultimately, this will improve efficiency and effectiveness in the delivery of positive healthcare outcomes.
Total 11 results found
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