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1.Current state of information exchange between the two most popular BIM software: Revit and Tekla

Author:Nizam, RS;Zhang, C

Source:SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES,2016,Vol.

Abstract:Information exchange between domain-specific software products is essential for capturing the life cycle information of a building from its inception to operation. To collect all specialized information within a single model requires a platform that is acceptable to all different software tools. Many researchers have suggested that this objective can be approached by using vendor-neutral and open building information models such as the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) to capture and exchange data. To analyze the effectiveness of the IFC model, this paper presents a data exchange analysis between two of the most popular BIM software to date: Revit and Tekla. Models are exchanged in the two software using IFC and a comparison is made in terms of data loss and misrepresentation. Revit seems to process IFC data easily however minor changes are noticed during the exchange. Tekla needs conversion procedures before IFC data can be processed. The architectural features of the model are found to be seriously misrepresented in Tekla.

2.The Future of Vernacular Architecture in China: Redefining Vernacular Architecture through Contemporary Design and Emerging Technology

Author:Yang, N;Chen, B;Kronenburg, R;Xi, JJ

Source:SMART AND HEALTHY WITHIN THE TWO-DEGREE LIMIT (PLEA 2018), VOL 3,2018,Vol.3

Abstract:This research aims to provide an insight into the existing research and practices on vernacular architecture, serving as a basis for further research on vernacular architecture in China and the relevant design research both locally and internationally. It also attempts to identify approaches that can improve the overall sustainability of vernacular architecture from a retrospective perspective, using emerging technologies in contemporary architecture. It looks at the concept of vernacular architecture in contemporary contexts and provide methods for further sustainable practices.

3.Multi-Objective Optimization for Daylight Retrofit

Author:De Luca, F;Wortmann, T

Source:ECAADE 2020: ANTHROPOLOGIC - ARCHITECTURE AND FABRICATION IN THE COGNITIVE AGE, VOL 1,2020,Vol.

Abstract:In sustainable building design, daylight improves occupants' wellbeing and reduces electric lighting use, but glazed areas can increase energy consumption for heating and cooling. Conflicting objectives such as daylight and energy consumption are the primary motivation behind multi-objective optimization. This paper presents the multi-objective optimization problem of maximizing daylight availability and minimizing whole energy consumption for the daylight retrofit of Tallinn University of Technology assembly hall, currently windowless. We present benchmark results of six different multi-objective algorithms and analyze the solutions on the best-known Pareto front. The majority of the analyzed solutions allow for adequate daylight provision of the building without additional energy consumption. Results of daylight and energy simulations for the analyzed solutions, are presented and discussed.

4.Campus developments China Versus Middle East

Author:Loehlein, G

Source:INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: ARCHITECTURE ACROSS BOUNDARIES,2019,Vol.

Abstract:Campus developments are great social cultural and economic indicator for how a country views education on the one side and on the other what value architecture has in this. The paper is assessing the key stakeholder. The impact education has on the community and economy. Architectural designers are driven by their own design as well as economic ambition. The architectural choice of campus designs in the UAE is driven by internationalization drive. China seems to be more driven by internal flexibility and drive to have a symbolic architectural expression of the campus.

5.Dynamical analysis of a substation structure under short-circuit current loadings

Author:Gong, G;Jiang, W

Source:SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES,2016,Vol.

Abstract:The past several decades have seen a rapid increase of open-air substations to satisfy energy demands, which is partly contributed by up-to-date knowledge and development on short-circuit mechanical effects in substations from a structural engineering viewpoint. Substation structures with flexible conductors are complex, and nonlinear dynamics analysis is required. In this paper, ADINA will be used for such purposes with considerations of geometry nonlinear behaviour of conductor cables under short-circuit loadings. Focus is placed on the investigations of effects of droppers and spacers, together with pinch effects for twin conductors considering the contact nonlinearity.

6.Characterization of Nash equilibria of large games

Author:Fu, HF;Wu, B

Source:JOURNAL OF MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS,2019,Vol.85

Abstract:For a large game with traits, this paper characterizes its trait-action distributions in equilibrium by using an inequality under the following two sets of conditions: (i) both trait space and action space of the game contain at most countably many elements; (ii) the agent space is nowhere equivalent to the characteristic type space. Two examples are presented to show the failure of the characterization result when the conditions are not satisfied. Then, we also show the existence of the characterization inequality and the necessity of the two sets of conditions to the characterization results. Finally, the existence of Nash equilibria under the two sets of conditions comes naturally as a corollary. (C) 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

7.SPECULATIVE URBAN TYPES A Cellular Automata Evolutionary Approach

Author:Dounas, T;Spaeth, B;Wu, H;Zhang, CK

Source:PROCEEDINGS OF THE 22ND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMPUTER-AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN RESEARCH IN ASIA (CAADRIA 2017): PROTOCOLS, FLOWS AND GLITCHES,2017,Vol.

Abstract:The accelerated rate of urbanization in China is the motivator behind this paper. As a response to the observed monotonous housing developments in Suzhou Industrial Park (SIP) and elsewhere our method exploits Cellular Automata (CA) combined with fitness evaluation algorithms to explore speculatively the potential of building regulations for increased density and diversity through an automated design algorithm. The well-known Game of Life CA is extended from its original 2-dimensional functionality into the realm of three dimensions and enriched with the possibility of resizing the involved cells according to their function. Moreover our method integrates the "social condenser" as a means of diversifying functional distribution within the Cellular Automata as well as solar radiation as requested by the existing building regulation. The method achieves a densification of the development from 31%% to 39%% ratio of footprint to occupied volume whilst obeying the solar radiation rule and offering a more diverse functional occupation. This proof of concept demonstrates a solid approach to the automated design of housing developments at an urban scale with a, yet limited, evaluation procedure including solar radiation which can be extended to other performance criteria in future work.

8.An Eco-poetic Approach to Architecture Across Boundaries

Author:Westermann, C

Source:INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: ARCHITECTURE ACROSS BOUNDARIES,2019,Vol.

Abstract:As highlighted by the post-Cartesian discourse across philosophical schools, Western thought had been struggling for a long time with conceiving interconnectedness. The problematic of Western dualism is most apparent with the so-called mind-body problem, but the issue does not only relate to the separation of body and mind but also the separation of living beings from their environments. Asian philosophy, on the other hand, has had a long history of thinking relations. The paper argues that an architectural philosophy that is open for a dialogue with Asian views would allow for a new approach to conceptualising the interconnectedness of minds, bodies, environments, and cultures. Linking Asian and Western aesthetics with a discourse on ecology, and setting it into dialogue with contemporary theories of architecture, the paper also refers to recent research on embodiment that is engaging from a new point of view with the natural sciences, and that appears to confirm positions of traditional Chinese philosophy. Reconsidering traditional Chinese art and aesthetics, the paper suggests, could initiate a new eco-poetic way of thinking the built environment and its design in favour of a future that is more than smart.

9.'In need of a foreign trademark' English literature in Mainland China

Author:Matthews, G

Source:FUTURE OF ENGLISH IN ASIA: PERSPECTIVES ON LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE,2016,Vol.

10.Introduction of Decentralized Ventilation systems in buildings

Author:Kim, MK

Source:SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES,2016,Vol.

Abstract:In this study, the decentralized ventilation performance of a small air ventilator to replace natural ventilation for use in urban areas is analyzed and compared to conventional centralized ventilation systems in Central European climates. This unit is equipped with a fan, air filter and air damper, as well as a heat exchanger, which is to be operated when the supply air also needs to provide heating or cooling. Compared with a conventional centralized economizer, this system has shorter air transport distances and therefore entails lower pressure losses. In a decentralized system, fan speed and airflow rate are adjusted simply and effectively depending on indoor thermal conditions.

11.Complexity and Simplicity Tensions in teaching computation to large numbers of architecture students

Author:Spaeth, AB;Dounas, T;Kieferle, J

Source:ECAADE 2016: COMPLEXITY & SIMPLICITY, VOL 1,2016,Vol.

Abstract:This paper describes the challenges and approaches to introduce computational thinking to a large and diverse group of architecture students during an international workshop with 300 students from different cultural backgrounds and educational levels, also integrating a diverse group of tutors whose computational expertise varied extremely. The approach suggested articulating a design task which enforced computational thinking but enabled different levels of engagement with the computer as a tool. Hypothetically this would allow all participants to engage with the computational thinking agenda regardless their computational affinity even whilst applying analogue methods. Besides the intercultural experience the workshop was successful in exposing a large group of students and tutors to the concepts of computational design whilst accommodating different learning preferences and engagement with the computer as a device.

12.Aerodynamic Shape Optimization for High-Rise Conceptual Design Integrating and validating parametric design, (fast) fluid dynamics, structural analysis and optimization

Author:Zhang, R;Waibel, C;Wortmann, T

Source:ECAADE 2020: ANTHROPOLOGIC - ARCHITECTURE AND FABRICATION IN THE COGNITIVE AGE, VOL 1,2020,Vol.

Abstract:Using an integrated workflow with parametric design, Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) and Fast Fluid Dynamic (FFD) simulations, structural analysis and optimization, this paper evaluates the relative suitability of CFD and FFD simulations for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization (ASO). Specifically, it applies RBFOpt, a model-based optimization algorithm, to the ASO of a supertall high-rise. The paper evaluates the accuracy of the CFD and FDD simulations relative to a slower, more exact CFD simulation, and the performance of the model-based optimization algorithm relative to CMA-ES, an evolutionary algorithm. We conclude that FFD is useful for relative comparisons, such as for optimization, but less accurate than CFD in terms of absolute quantities. Although results tend to be similar, CMA-ES performs less well than RBFOpt for both large and small numbers of simulations, and for both CFD and FFD. RBFOpt with FFD emerges as the most suitable method for conceptual design, as it is much faster and only slightly less effective than RBFOpt with CFD.

13.DIGITAL TOOLS, ANALOGUE MINDS A Project-based Framework for Understanding the Dialogue In-between

Author:Raonic, A;Raonic, M

Source:PROCEEDINGS OF THE 22ND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMPUTER-AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN RESEARCH IN ASIA (CAADRIA 2017): PROTOCOLS, FLOWS AND GLITCHES,2017,Vol.

Abstract:This paper is situated in a specific research by design setting, where the realised work of architecture has been generated with digital tools operated by analogue minds of designers. It examines the relation-ship between the two entities, the designer and the tools, in an attempt to understand their specific roles better, trusting that this can lead to anew ways of enhancing the design process. Through revisiting the processes, methods, techniques and tools employed within various design-cycles of the project, authors present their own/designerly/experience, pointing to both the potentials and limitations of the digital tools used. The attention is drawn to the importance for a human designer to have a critical awareness of the true nature of the computational systems and the capacity of both to adapt to the given context, in order to be able to embrace them and use to their full potentials.

14.Study of morphological structures of historical centres as a basic tool for understanding the new conditions of social habitat. Quito, Suzhou, and Syracuse

Author:Gritti, A;Rosero, V;Dall'Asta, JC;Rocchio, D;Porreca, R;Tagliabue, F

Source:24TH ISUF INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: CITY AND TERRITORY IN THE GLOBALIZATION AGE,2018,Vol.

Abstract:In the age of globalization, architecture (through an identity crisis) is directly connected with the loss of progressive recognition of morphological studies of city and territory, in a gradual replacement with real-time views of phenomena and urban facts. The satellite gaze finally flattens the interpretation ability of living spaces that were the prerogative of the morphological studies. The actual complexity of cities and territories escapes from the architect's eyes as they increase their technical capability to know details. The season of great renovations and methodological studies that had powered the 1960s, 70s and 80s seems hopelessly distant. Studies on social, economic, and environmental components of the cities and territories (infrastructure, public space, environmental networks) are so proliferated without actually being supported by adequate interpretations of their physical-spatial dynamics. The result: a substantial failure of architectural design to express human habitat visions. It is imperative a theoretical and practical effort to pick up the threads of an interrupted conversation, and return where these studies have expressed their richest potential: the historical centers, the places with most dense and rich heritage. Historical centers of cities like Quito, Syracuse and Suzhou have settled and stratified the morphological structures of several different settlement patterns. As a result, architecture has demonstrated an ability of description and interpretation. Reflecting on how this goal was reached in these cities (by means much less powerful than the current) settlement will be able to bid the morphological component of urban and regional studies and architecture project as a fundamental tool for understanding the human habitat.

15.CONTINGENCY BETWEEN KNOWLEDGE CHARACTERISTICS AND KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER MECHANISM: AN INTEGRATIVE FRAMEWORK

Author:Li, ZY;Xi, YM

Source:MANAGING KNOWLEDGE FOR GLOBAL AND COLLABORATIVE INNOVATIONS,2010,Vol.8

Abstract:Drawing on the knowledge-based view of the firm, this paper investigates the effectiveness of different organizational mechanisms on knowledge transfer. In this study, we propose a paradigm for managing the complex process of knowledge transfer. Its central theme is that the effectiveness of knowledge transfer depends on the fit between knowledge characteristics and transfer mechanism. It is argued that different knowledge requires different organizational mechanisms to support its transfer. A theoretical framework is developed to provide an analytical perspective on this issue. Two categories of organizational mechanism for knowledge transfer are identified (i.e., formal and informal mechanism), the types, dimensions, and characteristics of knowledge are discussed, and the nature of this fit is examined.

16.Student Perceptions of Sony's Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Policies and Activities with Regard to Environment

Author:Wang, YN

Source:2015 3RD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SOCIAL SCIENCES RESEARCH (SSR 2015),2015,Vol.13

Abstract:This paper examines Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University (XJTLU) Year-2 students' perception of Sony's Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) policies and activities with regard to environment. To study in depth, this research mainly focuses on two research questions by means of questionnaire. Overall, the findings of the report show that environmental policies become increasingly necessary for consumers, so it could significantly affect their choices.

17.The Emergence of Collaborative Tourism: An Application of Intimacy Theory

Author:Yuan, RZ

Source:PROCEEDINGS OF 2018 CHINA MARKETING INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: SMART MARKETING: HUMAN, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION,2018,Vol.

Abstract:The emergence of collaborative tourism presents a rich vein for advancing the empirical and theoretical understanding of tourists' satisfaction towards the destination. Recent literature suggests that the social and networked nature of social media is an ideal environment for peer to peer interaction in the travelling scenarios. However, there has been limited research into defining and developing collaboration tourism, including how do collaborative tourists interact and how do these collaborative behaviours influence their emotional reactions towards the travel destination. This study provides insights into the impact of tourism collaboration on tourist satisfaction due to tourists' perceived intimacy towards the destination. A sample of collaboration members was drawn from tourism community in China. The structural equation modelling results show that information sharing and behavioural collaboration have significant impacts on tourists' physical, verbal, spiritual and intellectual intimacy towards the peers in the destination, which lead to higher level of satisfaction towards the place. This study contributes to the existing literature on collaboration tourism by examining that: (1) the collaborative tourism becomes important to consumers, and is an interpersonal relationship; (2) the collaboration behaviours among tourists create intimacy within the tourism experience, and (3) those physical and emotional sensations/intimacies increase tourists' satisfaction towards the destination.

18.CLASSROOM RESPONSE TECHNOLOGY: HOW TO ENGAGE THE DISENGAGED MIND IN CHINA

Author:Bao, CZ

Source:EDULEARN13: 5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION AND NEW LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES,2013,Vol.

Abstract:Without engaging the students effectively, the likelihood of success in any particular teaching format is questionable. Engagement in the classroom or lecture theatre is a joint negotiation between student and faculty. Students should be provided with the environment to play an active part in meeting desired learning outcomes. This can in part be achieved by educational institutions investing in the student through providing appropriate educational practices and conditions to create a positive and active learning environment, thus facilitating student engagement in the learning process. Student engagement is complex and involves a number of variables, including those that affect the potential for learning success (Horstmanshof & Zimitat, 2007). Student engagement is particularly important in the Chinese higher educational context, where large classes are the norm. This is particularly the case in transnational educational (TNE) institutions, where students may not only be in large classes, but also learning in a second or foreign language. This paper draws on one of the findings from an internally funded teaching development project that investigated engagement issues associated with a multidisciplinary business module delivered to year 2 students at an English speaking university in Suzhou, China. Large classes have become increasingly common as the university continues to expand, especially in student intensive disciplines such as those found in the Business School at the university. Mulryan-Kyne (2010) suggests that increases in class size at university bring new issues and problems, including increases in staff: student ratios, and resultant lack of contact with lecturers and tutors, leading to a return to passive teaching methods and learning. Using a content analysis from data collected through focus groups of students associated with the module, an 'Introduction to Organisation and Management', as well as staff teaching on the module and from the wider and business school, a number of themes have been identified. These can be broadly categorized as being related to innovative use of technology in the lecture room; enriching educational delivery; and faculty presentability. The current paper concentrates on the use of personal response systems, or 'clickers', which the student focus groups identified as being beneficial in large classes. The literature suggests that clickers can have positive benefits for promoting active learning (Hinde and Hunt, 2006; Patry, 2009) and promoting teacher: student engagement (Roschelle et al, 2004), encourage critical thinking during class (Cooper and Robinson, 2000) and that there may be some positive correlation between use of clickers and assessment (Morling et al, 2008). Less positive reactions include the 'gimmick effect' where there seems to be no clear rationale for the learning value of 'clickers' beyond the sake of using it (Simpson and Oliver, 2006), and possible increased student anxiety (Johnson and McLeod, 2004). This paper discusses how the student experience of 'clickers' in the Chinese and TNE context reflects the literature. Drawing on personal experience of how my own teaching practices have been informed by the research, it concludes by providing pointers for future successful engagement in this unique context.

19.Factors Influencing the User Acceptance of Alipay

Author:Guo, HJ;Huang, X;Craig, P

Source:PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2015 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ECONOMY, MANAGEMENT AND EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY,2015,Vol.29

Abstract:This study looks at factors that influence user adoption of third-part-payment systems such as Alipay and PayPal. A research model and five hypotheses are proposed based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT). These relate different factors to user adoption and form the basis of a survey which we present to a sample of 207 Chinese consumers. Our hypotheses are tested using a paired t-test with results revealing that, social influence, performance expectancy and facilitating conditions are the factors most likely to affect user adoption.

20.Compressive and flexural strength of Ultra-High Performance Fibre Reinforced Concrete containing recycled rubber crumb

Author:Wang, X;Xia, J;Li, Y

Source:SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES,2016,Vol.

Abstract:Ultra-High Performance Fibre Reinforced Concrete (UHPFRC) has excellent mechanical properties and good durability. However, the embodied energy of UHPFRC is much higher than that of ordinary concrete due to the high usage of cement. In order to reduce the adverse environmental impact of utilizing UHPFRC, recycled rubber crumb is used as an additional component or as a replacement for fine aggregates. Cube specimens with two different mix design schemes were investigated during this study. The reduction of compressive strength was investigated. UHPFRC prisms were also cast and loaded in four point bending tests to check the reduction of flexural strength. The mixing procedure and temperature variation during the casting process was recorded. Some cube specimens were heat cured in hot water at 90 degree Celsius for forty-eight hours. Those cubes were tested following curing at around 7 days to obtain the early age strength, while other cubes are normally cured in water at around 20 degree Celsius with the prisms until 28 days.
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